The future depends on what we do in the present.
— Mahatma Gandhi
Imagine a World: 10 Actions for the Future
1
Champion Environmental Education
Become a vocal advocate for EE, and make environmental education's contributions to society more explicit to encourage higher levels of public support.
2
Build a Bigger and More Inclusive Field
Ensure that people of all races, ethnicities, sexual preferences, genders, abilities, and socio-economic backgrounds have access to high-quality environmental education and are leading the movement to create a more sustainable future. Embrace new ideas, partnerships, and innovations from a diversity of sectors and fields to help achieve the sustainable development goals.
3
Create and Empower Global Citizens
Promote environmental education's role in advancing civic engagement, enhancing deliberation, critical thinking skills, and active participation and motivating individuals, organizations, and communities to take an active role in creating positive change.
4
Grow Global EE Leadership
Develop a leadership pipeline to create a cadre of global leaders who have the 21st Century skills to address current and future sustainability issues. Promote ongoing professional development to sustain leadership.
5
Invest in Research and Evaluation to Improve Practice
Continue to invest in research in the field, to drive innovation and new thinking about what can help create a more environmentally literate and civically engaged global society. Deliver clearer actions, outcomes, and impact.
6
Connect and Collaborate for Change
Collaborate with other organizations and agencies to create a multiplier effect that can impact the larger environment, sustainability, and education communities. Use the power of technology to leverage meaningful opportunities to learn, network, and share.
7
Expand Environmental Education's Role in Achieving Conservation Success
Enhance collaboration between environmental education professionals and conservation leaders to more effectively achieve conservation goals—from protecting species and wild spaces to engaging people in conservation planning.
8
Provide Universal Access to Environmental Education and Nature
Through innovative policies and practices—such as citizen science, project-based learning, and service learning—demonstrate how connecting people of all ages to nature, coupled with effective educational approaches, can help build a lifelong stewardship ethic.
9
Strengthen Environmental Education's Role in Achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals
Actively develop partnerships and collaborations that address how environmental education can help achieve the sustainable development goals (SDGs) and targets, leading to a more just, equitable society.
10
Develop a Global Fund for Environmental Education
Identify and cultivate long-term funding sources to advance and sustain environmental education at the local, regional, national, and global levels and continue to support innovative partnerships to expand the reach and impact of the field.
Background
As environmental educators, we know that environmental education informs, inspires, and enlightens. It builds human capacity, provokes questions, enhances skills and shapes values and attitudes. It galvanizes individuals, families and communities to make informed decisions about the environment that lead to a sustainable society. Even more, it helps people connect deeply with each other, their communities, and the natural world.

Given the unprecedented challenges we face as a global society—from climate change and biodiversity loss to decreasing access to nature and a growing gap between the rich and poor—there has never been a more important time to scale up our environmental education efforts. Global leaders must make better use of education and capacity-building as strategies to improve the environment, along with tools of governance, regulation, economic and community incentives, and technology.

The Global Environmental Education Partnership (GEEP) is focused on building capacity for environmental education and sustainability around the world and using the power of education to help address global environmental and social problems. Its advisors are made up of researchers, policymakers, education practitioners, and others who represent government and non-governmental sectors from countries and regions around the world.

The GEEP believes that national and international professional networks are essential to ensuring the quality of education in, about, and for the environment in communities, nations, and regions. These networks need support from a wide range of policy makers, environmental and educational organizations, and other stakeholders. As a network of networks, GEEP brings together partners who are committed to helping global citizens address environmental and social challenges by developing and strengthening environmental education worldwide.

This Call for Action is asking the international environmental education community to take stock of where we are as a field and think ahead to the future. It includes ten draft actions, crafted with input from GEEP leaders from around the world, and is designed to get input from educators working in this field about our key priorities for the next decade.

You can help shape the future agenda by letting us know what you think. Which actions are most important? What's missing? Visit ActNowForEE.org and cast your vote for your top three priorities and let us know what you think matters most. Your input will help create a global action plan for the next 10 years.
The Global Environmental Education Partnership (GEEP)
Launched in 2014 to help solve global problems using EE and ESD on an international scale, the Global Environmental Education Partnership (GEEP) is focused on how education can help solve global environmental and social problems. It is comprised of policymakers, education practitioners, and researchers who represent government and non-governmental sectors from more than 20 countries and regions.

The GEEP believes that national and international professional networks are essential to ensuring the quality of education in, about, and for the environment in communities, nations, and regions. These networks need support from a wide range of policy makers, environmental and educational organizations, and other stakeholders. As a network of networks, GEEP brings together partners who are committed to helping global citizens address environmental and social challenges by developing and strengthening environmental education worldwide.

Tbilisi +40: Where do we go from here?
The Tbilisi Declaration of 1977 provided us with the framework, principles, and guidelines for environmental education at local, national, regional, and international levels for all ages, and for all people, both inside and outside formal school systems. (To find out more about Tbilisi, click here).

Since that gathering of world environmental education leaders in Tbilisi, Georgia, 40 years ago, there have been a number of global advances (visit ActNowforEE.org for a full timeline), including the success of the Millennium Development Goals, the Decade for Education for Sustainability, and the international adoption of a set of ambitious Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These 17 goals are designed to protect the planet, end poverty, address climate change, and ensure prosperity for all as part of a new sustainable development agenda, with specific targets to be achieved over the next fifteen years.

As environmental educators, this is a critical time for us to think about our role in achieving the SDGs. How can environmental education best improve overall education in formal and nonformal settings, address climate change, stem the loss of biodiversity, create sustainable cities, and tackle the other issues? We bring an understanding of environmental issues and their connection to social justice, economic prosperity, and community engagement. We also bring skills in understanding how people of all ages learn, how to bring multiple disciplines together to creatively solve problems, and how to create educational opportunities that result in positive action.

We know that environmental education differs in significant ways around the world. It's important that EE is recognizable to educators in all countries, and reflects the best of historic thinking and contemporary scholarship and practice, while respecting local norms, culture, and context. It's also important to design and provide environmental education in ways that address local, national, and/or global priorities that strengthen core support for our field and open new horizons for education.

As we mark Tbilisi+40 and look ahead to the future, our challenge is to ensure that learners everywhere have equal access to an effective environmental education that will create global stewards of the environment and build a more sustainable world.
In a world with increasing capabilities to network, we embrace our responsibilities and commit ourselves to carry forward the recommendations from this conference. The United Nations system and governments worldwide need to support environmental education and develop sound education for sustainable development policy frameworks and commit to their implementation.

We urge all people to join us in pursuing the principles of sustainability with humility, inclusivity, integrity, and a strong sense of humanity. We move forward from Ahmedabad in a spirit of hope, enthusiasm and commitment to action.
— Tbilisi +30 Ahmedabad, India
Environmental Education Today:
Building on the Past
Charter of the United Nations
The Tbilisi Declaration, Tbilisi Georgia
Belgrade Charter
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Declaration on the Rights of the Child
Rio Declaration and Rio +10 (Principle 21, etc)
UN Decade for Sustainable Development
UNESCO Global Citizenship Education
Tbilisi +30, Ahmedabad, India
UN: Sustainable Development Goals
THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP

Mission and Goals
The core mission of the GEEP is to create a vibrant learning network designed to strengthen environmental education locally, regionally and globally. To accomplish this mission, the GEEP is striving to:
● build capacity to advance policy, governance, and practice in environmental education around the world, including at the local, regional, national and international levels
● foster strategic partnerships to create a vibrant "network for networks" resulting in a stronger global environmental education community
● promote and encourage innovation in environmental education on a global scale.


GEEP is a partnership between the Environmental Protection Administration of Taiwan, the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and the North American Association for Environmental Education.
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